Safety+Health: Safety Month-falls

This week the National Safety Council is focusing on preventing falls for Safety Month. Make sure to visit them to get safety tips to prevent falls, including falls from ladders. I will also be posting and sharing content on my social media channels to help educate people on preventing falls. Also, make sure to check out Little Giant on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for safety tips! If you join the conversation, make sure to use the hashtag #No1GetsHurt.

No-one-gets-hurt

Blood Clots and a Ladder Accident

ladder-fall-offThe CDC has an article on its website about a ladder accident. Back in February 2003, a substitute school custodian was changing a light bulb on the back wall of an auditorium state. He had been working alone at 16 feet tall and was able to call 911 on his cell phone. He had been on the second from the top rung . At the time, he suffered pain in his ankles and knees and a broken leg, requiring surgery. Just four days after the fall, he died from a blood clot. According to the medical examiner stated that the victim, the fall and fractures caused the blood clots in both legs.

In the article, the CDC gave a couple of recommendations for preventing accidents like this one.

Recommendations from the CDC:

  • Have a safety professional evaluate a situation for risks before  a custodian does the  custodial work.
  • Schools should provide safety training to the custodial staff so they can be safer
  • Schools need to have a safety manager as part of the staff to help assess and fix risks

This story is truly a tragedy. Unfortunately, we don’t know exactly what caused this accident, but I’d like to end this post with a couple of reminders.

  1. Never stand on the top rung or top cap. It is just too difficult to maintain balance and there is no way to maintain three points of contact.  If something causes the worker to lose balance he or she then has nothing to grab onto.
  2. Maintain three points  of contact. Maintaining three points of contact guarantees that if something happens while you are on the ladder, you will have something to grab onto to help you stay safe.

Safety Month by NSC

No-one-gets-hurtJune is Safety Month by the National Safety Council.

National Safety Month focuses on reducing leading causes of injury and death at work, on the road and at home. On their website, the National Safety Council provides downloadable resources highlighting a different safety topic for each week in June. Here are the topics being focused on this month:

  • Week 1: Emergency Preparedness
  • Week 2: Wellness
  • Week 3: Falls
  • Week 4: Driving

Next week, the focus is on falls, and we will be focusing on a how to prevent falls from ladders.

Stay tuned for next week’s details!

 

 

ASSE

Thank you to everyone who came to our booth at the ASSE Show (Safety2018) last week. We had a great time showing everyone our newest products. Here’s a picture the team from Occupational Health & Safety took of me showing the HyperLite. I wish I could talk about all the highlights from the show, but there’s just not enough room in this post!

Make sure to visit https://ohsonline.com/live to check out all the highlights from the show!

Scottish Man Dies in Ladder Accident

 

Like many of our true story articles, there isn’t much detail about what he as doing on the ladder, and, because it was an emergency situation, there is little, if anything, that could have been done to prevent this accident.

Our hearts go out to this man’s family during this challenging time, and we hope that Here are just a couple of precautions to take when using a ladder:

1. Use the buddy system. Have someone close by when you are on a ladder. You may want to have them hold the ladder while you climb to help prevent slipping. Or, they could keep an eye on you to help you be safer.

2. Never use the ladder if you have been feeling unwell. Cardiac arrest can come on quickly, so this step probably wouldn’t have helped the man from this accident. However, do not climb your ladder if you are feeling dizzy, sick or otherwise unwell.

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