Using Your Adjustable Ladder

When you have work to do, an adjustable ladder can be a great option. For which jobs can you use your adjustable/articulating ladder? Here’s just a start:

Any job that’s on stairs. Each side of the ladder telescopes independently, so if you have a job on stairs, you can have one side of the ladder be shorter than the other side, so you can use your ladder safely if it is adjustable. This idea also applies to sloping ground. If you have to work on a small hill or stadium-style seating, your ladder can safely adjust your ladder to get your work done. Hanging pictures, painting, hanging light fixtures and adjusting smoke detectors are all examples of jobs for your ladder in the staircase position.

Getting on Your Roof. If you need to get on your roof, putting your ladder in the extension position can make that happen. Always use a tall enough ladder and extend it three feet past the roofline. Do you have a roof to inspect? Gutters to clean? Regardless of the task at hand, when used in the extension position, your ladder can help you get any roof-related job complete. The extension position can also help you complete tasks like washing windows.

Almost any Other Job. You can also use your ladder in the stepladder position, and this position allows you to complete almost any job we haven’t covered already. Framing, cleaning, inspecting your home and landscaping are all examples of jobs for your ladder in the stepladder position.

These are just a few examples of jobs for your adjustable ladder, but the options are truly endless!

Benefits of a Platform Stepladder

In the industrial world, we talk a lot about the stereotypical, heavy-duty, industrial ladders – Extension ladders, Articulating ladders, Enclosed ladders and all the variations in these categories.

Today, let’s talk about an unsung hero, the Platform Stepladder.

Some of Little Giant’s platform stepladders include the MightyLite, the AirWing, the Xtra-Lite Plus and the Flip-N-Lite.

Here are a couple of reasons why I love this style of ladder.

  1. They are super lightweight.
  2. They have a super-small storage profile, making them easy to bring from job to job.
  3. They can be set up or taken down with one hand, and they take barely any time to do either.
  4. They are available in fiberglass, so they can be a great ladder for electricians.
  5. The platform helps you get close to your job while limited the foot fatigue that can happen when standing on narrow rungs for hours on end.

Right now, my favorite platform ladder is the MightyLite. It’s made with the same lightweight fiberglass as the HyperLite extension ladders, making it almost as lightweight as an aluminum option. The MightyLight also has all sorts of features engineered into it. The top cap’s design allows you to bring almost any tool you could imagine. There is a hook for a paint can, grooves for drills, nails, screwdrivers, even a groove to hold a fluorescent tubeThe  MightyLite also has the Ground Cue™ bottom rung indicator to let you know when you’ve reached the bottom rung.

Do you use a platform stepladder? Which one is your favorite?

Airplane Death

A pilot from New Zealand died when he fell from a ladder. He had been doing some maintenance on his property when the accident happened. The man started flying when he worked in parachute operation and then worked in tourism, where had the opportunity to use his flight skills.

This story is tragic. Our hearts go out to this man’s family, friends and all who knew him.

What could have been done to prevent this accident? The article talks a lot about his pilot history and not a lot about the actual accident, but here are just a few things we can remember so we don’t have a similar accident.

  1. Use the right height and type of ladder for the job.
  2. Keep your body between the rails.
  3. Set up your ladder on firm, level ground.
  4. Have a spotter/don’t use the ladder alone.

We don’t know for certain what caused the accident, but we do know it is tragic, and we hope to prevent similar accidents from happening to anyone else.

Some Recent Travels

As you know, I spend a lot of time on the road providing training to groups of people. Here are just a couple of pictures from some of my most recent trips.

The St Louis Arch from my trip down there in April

OSHA Stand-Down with Builders Mutual in North Carolina

Roofing Safety in Pittsburgh

Have I visited your company? If you’d like to be featured on the blog, send pictures, and I will share something about my visit to you!

DIY Safety

Spring and summer is the time for DIY projects, both outside and inside. With DIY projects, more and more people are using their ladders to get work done. If you are a DIYer, here are a couple of reminders so you can keep getting your work done safely!

  1.  Move your ladder if you need to.  If you find yourself leaning, take two seconds to move your ladder closer to your work.
  2. Get a tall enough ladder. Standing on the top rung or top cap of your ladder makes it easy for the ladder to tip. If your ladder is not tall enough, find one that is.
  3. Find level ground. When working on your ladder, set it up on firm, level ground. If your ground is uneven, use a ladder with a leveler.

Stay safe while working on those projects!

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