Since the introduction of the leaning ladder, this style of ladder has been popping up on job sites around the country. While some ladders are designed to be used in the leaning position, dangers arise when ordinary stepladders are used in that position.

So, what can be done to help ensure non-leaning ladders aren’t being used incorrectly?

  1. Train, train train. If a ladder designed to be used in the leaning position shows up on your job site, provide proper training to the team. Teach them the benefits of the leaning ladder, but also teach them that not all ladders are designed to be used as leaning ladders. In fact, leaning ladders have extra grip on the feet so that they won’t slide out, unlike ordinary stepladders.
  2. Develop a procedure for if an ordinary ladder is used in the leaning position. Make sure your team knows the consequences of using a ladder unsafely. Will there be write-ups? Will all leaning ladders be taken out of service? You want to make sure the consequence is fair, but also effective.
  3. Choose the best ladders. Whether this means replacing all ordinary ladders, with ladders designed to be used as leaning ladders, or whether it means just having quality ladders on the job site, make sure you always have the best ladders to help you climb safely.